The Dilbert Principle in Action

The Dilbert Principle states: The most ineffective workers are systematically moved to the place where they can do the least damage — MANAGEMENT.

Last week someone (presumably facilities) installed a somewhat large (3 feet by 3 feet) box near the exit on our floor at work. Inside the box was to hold a defibrillator. Apparently it’s important all of a sudden to have one of these. I’m hoping there’s someone out there that’s trained and certified on it (but it wouldn’t surprise me if they just installed it without doing that).

Anyways, as all stories go, things begin to get weird. First, they neglected to inform anyone that the box was alarmed and of course some individuals were intrigued at the presence of new medical equipment so they just had to try it out (nothing like good electro-shock therapy to make it through those lunch hour meetings). Sometime after the initial deployment, a post-it note was placed on the box that said “Box is alarmed”. Good to know and well put. Skip ahead a couple of days later. The defibrillator mysteriously disappears. Since the box was alarmed, I can only imagine someone who was authorized to remove it did so. Otherwise there would be a distinquishable “whoop-whoop” sound echoing through the halls and I don’t recall that happening. Now we move ahead in time a few more days to the present. The box is still empty however now someone has kindly replaced the “Box is alarmed” post-it with a “Box is empty” post-it. I can’t wait to see what shows up today. “This box intentionally left empty” post-it? Your guess is as good as mine.

Nothing like smart people doing smart things. I hear bells ringing for some new induction into the management stream.